texas chainsaw massacre

Poor Tobe Hooper. A promising young Austin filmmaker from the beginning of his career, he made a college film called “eggshells” in 1969, a counter-culture film of its time, but the career for which he is known really began with 1974’s “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”. This is the film that would put him on the map in the history of horror forever, but would also be the stumbling block for him as he tried to grow as a director.

Texas Chainsaw 3D

As with many of its 70's horror franchise contemporaries, "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" has become a series whose present continues to lose connection with its past, even as new entries stumble over themselves to pay homage to their roots. In 1974, Tobe Hooper and Kim Henkel captured lightning in a bottle with a chaotic, nasty film about a family of cannibals living deep in the heart of Texas.

The Saw is Family this week as we discuss "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Part II"

Variety is reporting that Twisted Pictures, the unheralded geniuses behind the Saw franchise, are in the process of purchasing the rights to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, previously owned by the date-rapists over at Platinum Dunes. This is all part of Twisted's plan to corner the market on all films that have saws in them. Hey-O!!!

Dread Central has posted the cast list (Milla Jovovich, Wentworth Miller, Ali Larter) and synopsis for Resident Evil 4: Afterlife (In a world ravaged by infection, Alice continues her...blah blah blah...). The final line, however, of Dread's report reads: “Thankfully, Mike Epps will remain dead.” I, for one, enjoy Mike Epps and, unlike Dread Central, love black people and wish them continued success in the horror movie genre. KILL WHITEY!

Gary Ross, the writer of the Tom Selleck comedy classic Mr. Baseball, has been tapped to write a solo Venom movie. Venom, who you may remember, was killed at the end of Spider-Man 3, but, if anyone can ret-con this fallacy, it's the writer of Mr. Baseball! (Netflix this NOW!)

Before a recent screening of "Parasomnia", Mick Garris, Wes Craven and Tobe Hooper were all asked about remakes, and their opinions on the subjects. I think we all know how Craven and Hooper feel, but it's Garris' words that really stuck with me. He perfectly sums up the issue with some remakes. Here's what he said: