The gang goes to war with graboids in Tremors: A Cold Day in Hell

Tremors: A Cold Day in Hell is a classic over-promise-under-deliver scenario. Based on the title and marketing, this, the sixth film in the Tremors series, seems to promise graboids – the franchise’s iconic giant, carnivorous worms – stalking a frozen Arctic tundra. Admittedly, that scenario makes no sense. Permafrost, one can assume, would not be an ideal habitat for a subterranean predator whose tactics are based entirely on moving swiftly through lose soil in pursuit of prey.

With less than a half a season left to go, Ash vs. Evil Dead found itself in a predicament that too many good shows have encountered. Suddenly they could be counted among the list of shows which have been cancelled mid-run.

Chris Diamantopoulos gets wild in Man Vs.

Soon I'll get to actually reviewing Man Vs., but first, a confession. While others chose to spend their Friday evenings in college during the mid-2000s grooving to Usher (featuring Lil Jon and Ludacris) or The Pussycat Dolls at a house party or bar, this reviewer could frequently be found in the company of good friends and one Les Stroud, a.k.a. “Survivorman.” As such, the antics of Stroud – and his more charismatic (and more British) survivalist compatriot, Bear Grylls – remain a nostalgia-addled guilty pleasure.

What do a bitter nightwatchman, a neurotic teenager, and a fast talking businessman expecting a child have in common? They are the anchors by which Ghost Stories manages to twist its anthology conceit in such a way that no matter how different, their experiences have a miraculous sense of connective tissues that begs audiences to re-watch the second it's over.

Editor's Note: In Extremis is an ongoing series that will address your burning legal plot hole queries from horror cinema. Example topics include but are not limited to, “Are blobs people in the eyes of the law?” or “Is the creature from The Thing just gerrymandering?”. Adam is BGH's official unofficial lawyer who continues to make our decisions regrettable and reminds everyone to never, ever listen to our advice. This time Adam considers whether or a not the undead can be jailed for causing a victim to give up the ghost.

It has been an emotional few weeks, folks. After my last recap I was feeling for the very first time that Ash vs. Evil Dead might be slowing down and getting old, just like it’s groovy protagonist.

Considering the political climate right now, the public outcry for gun control and vehement push back from the pro-gun side could factor into quite the interesting time for Ryûhei Kitamura's new film, Downrange, to sneak into its Shudder release (April 26, 2018). Random acts of senseless gun violence are a hotly contested topic right now due to the intense and opinionated voices on both sides of the gun conversation. I suppose it's fitting for Kitamura's film to be little more than a 90 minute vicious portrayal of random gun violence in a single location. 

The kids of A Quiet Place run for their lives through a cornfield at night

John Krasinski’s A Quiet Place is the rare movie that isn’t so much meant to be watched as it is experienced. It’s built around a gimmick that can only be fully appreciated in a crowded theater, like a no-tech version of something B-movie icon William Castle might have dreamed up half a century ago. Instead of vibrating chairs or hovering skeletons, Krasinski’s ploy is far more terrifying to modern moviegoers: silence. It’s almost as if, within its opening moments, the filmmaker dials down a theater’s soundscape until viewers feel guilty about breaking the tranquility.

Editor's Note: Team BGH welcomes Adam as our newly established legal correspondent! Adam has been on retainer since he selflessly offered his expertise pro bono regarding Joe's Beer Gutz segment on Episode 434: Squirm. He continues to make our decisions regrettable and reminds everyone to never, ever listen to our advice. In Extremis will cover all your burning legal plot hole queries from horror cinema. Example topics include but are not limited to, “Are blobs people in the eyes of the law?” or “Is the creature from The Thing just gerrymandering?”. This time Adam takes a look at the dubious legalities of the A Nightmare on Elm Street franchise

If you will indulge me a digression, I promise that it will come back around. When I was in high school, I was always partial to stories involving magical realism. When our teachers assigned books like Midnight’s Children or One Hundred Years of Solitude I ate them up while my classmates struggled and groaned. I have always loved the dream-like nature of stories that keep the audience guessing about what is and isn’t really happening at any given time.