zombie

Horror Icon Mini-Marathon: LUCIO FULCI

In the realm of Italian filmmaking, there are generally three big names that come up again and again in conversations about innovation, style, and universal appeal: Dario Argento, Mario Bava, and Lucio Fulci. Argento is still alive and making films, and Bava had a very successful career as a cinematographer before coming into his own as a visual director. But it is the staggering variety (and prolific career) of Lucio Fulci that is the focus of this week’s column.

Horror Icon Mini-Marathon: GEORGE A. ROMERO

The counterculture film movement never had a better representation than that of writer/director George A. Romero.

Horror By the Sub-Genres: VOODOO ZOMBIE HORROR

It’s hard to argue that there could be an iconic horror figure that is currently more popular than the zombie. From film to television to comics, the living dead have done to popular culture what they do to human flesh: they have devoured en masse and made converts of us all. The ultimate irony, of course, is that the creatures that populate these movies and shows that we love so much aren’t actually zombies at all.

World War Z - The Next Big Movie Flop?

Most anyone who's read Max Brooks' 2006 apocalyptic novel "World War Z" has been excited since hearing that it's being adapted for the big screen. Despite a complete oversaturation of Zombies in the last few years (I'll still take that over sparkling Vampires), fans seemed relieved to hear the movie would stay pure as possible to the book, was supported by an all-star cast and a hefty Hollywood budget and would be produced by none-other than the movie's leading character, Brad Pitt. However one thing we all know is that any movie can fail - and if the rumors are true, World War Z might be a full on, 50 foot free-fall belly flop onto wet pavement.

According to the project's screenwriter, Damon Lindelof in the June Issue of Vanity Fair, the project has hit disastrous proportions, including being over-budget by 50 million, troubles with inexperienced director Marc Forester, last minute re-writes, and incoherent storylines. We're not just talking minor script changes either - it was realized after filming was finished, that the entire 40 minute ending was "abrupt and incoherent".

Doomsday Book (REVIEW)

Doomsday Book is a South Korean anthology film from directors and co-writers Kim Ji-woon and Yim Pil-sung. Through the course of three, forty-five minute segments we are pulled through the final moments leading to possible apocalyptic events. Literally translated to English the title reads “Report on the Destruction of Mankind”. Though the subject matter may call to mind a host of grimly violent, depressive, and stomach churning cannibalistic fare (see what I did there?) the segments are nicely balanced with a healthy dose of humor and hope.

Remains (REVIEW)

“30 Days of Night” is one of my favorite movies of the 2000's so I was somewhat intrigued to find a low-budget zombie movie that was written by the same author. Unfortunately, the story of “Remains” lacks the clever and frightening setup of “30 Days of Night” that made that movie so unique and enjoyable. In fact, the contrast in quality between the two movies is so vast that it was actually kind of surprising that it came from the same person.

12 Movies for your Halloween Movie Marathon

Movie marathons are tricky business. Equal parts foresight, improvisation, impulse decision-making, and nostalgia that you really don’t have all that much control over in the long run. You can plan ahead all you want but the energy of a room can turn a slow-burn pee-pants fest into annoying background noise in no time. Add a holiday on top of things, say for example Halloween, and you got more problems than that Jay-Z character.

The Dead (REVIEW)

Lieutenant Brian Murphy, played by Rob Freeman, is the lone survivor of an American military-plane wreck. The plane crashed during a zombie outbreak, on the coast of Africa, and Murphy is forced to fight his way inland through hordes of shambling African zombies. He soon meets a local soldier named Sergeant Daniel Dembele, played by Prince David Osei, and they join forces to protect each other from the undead horde. Murphy is looking for a military air-force base so he can escape the continent, and Dembele is simply trying to reunite with his lost son.

Pretty Dead (REVIEW)

In the realm of independent genre fare, one figures that the low budget zombie flick and the found footage trope would be the equivalent of the old Reeses Peanut Butter Cup ads where chocolate and peanut butter smashed into one another in an orgiastic frenzy, ie; two great tastes that taste great together. Yet despite a legion of low budget zombie flicks being filmed in backyards across the country and the announcement of a new mockumentary style horror film seemingly every day, the genres have not crossed paths often, if at all.

Horror Comics: "Zombie Terrors"

“Zombie Terrors” #1, May 2012
Writers: Frank Forte ”Beheaded”, Royal McGraw “Feast”, Doug Williams “Hate”
Artists: Frank Forte “Beheaded”, Adauto Silva “Feast”, Doug Williams “Hate”
Publisher: Asylum Press

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