torture

Audition (REVIEW)

It’s pretty bizarre to me that, as notorious as the film “Audition” is, I’d somehow I’d made it this long without either watching it or even so much as hearing any of the specifics of the movie. In fact the only thing I’d really known about this movie is that it was one of the films that helped inspire “Hostel,” thereby helping to launch the “torture-porn” craze in horror here in the States.

Orphan Killer (REVIEW)

Orphan Killer

There are a lot of low-budget horror movies that are light on plot and character development, but few take it to such extremes as 2011’s “Orphan Killer.” This movie doesn’t let silly little things like story get in its way. There’s just a masked killer, some dark corridors, and a hot chick on the run. More than anything, it’s a throwback to early eighties slasher movies with a little “Saw” thrown in for good measure.

The Bloody Judge (REVIEW)

For most of Jesús Franco’s first 15 years of filmmaking he was contending with a powerful set of artistic limitations manifest most precisely in the fascist rule of Francisco Franco. While Jess, as he is more commonly known, left Spain for more habitable film production locales the specter of Franco’s rule seems to revel itself in the director’s oppositional, iconoclastic relationship with cinema censors.

The Loved Ones (REVIEW)

The angst and elation of maturity are the heartbeats of mainstream cinema’s adolescence. Through several decades of teen comedies and horror films there is the consistent playing out of maturation through sexuality, violence (graphic or not), and familial independence. Often genres such as comedy and horror are in themselves perceived as “adolescent” in their form and content. So it is unsurprising—if not appropriate—that such films often find teenagers as their core characters.

Album Review: Cannibal Corpse - "Torture"

I have always had a curious fascination with Cannibal Corpse, the veteran metal band originally formed in 1988. Unfortunately for the band, my fascination with them is largely due to reasons totally beyond their control, and interests that likely do not coincide with their ideals. First and foremost, Cannibal Corpse has always been represented in my life by the nerdiest of metal fans; kids with big, tangled mops of unkempt hair, glasses with thick lenses and arms that have never done a push-up voluntarily, and certainly not in the new millennium.

The Skin I Live In (La Piel Que Habito) (REVIEW)

It was only a matter of time before Pedro Almodóvar made a horror film. His decades long career directing, writing, and producing exhibits a constant concern for themes that flirt with the horror film genre. His films revel in all things melodramatic, the fluidity and ambiguity of sexual and gender identity, a love for surfaces and pop culture, camp, and the perils of isolation. A few of his films, namely “Carne Trémula” and “Atame!”, more precisely lean toward the horrific.

Episode 144 - "The Poughkeepsie Tapes"

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We're all creeped out by this movie... and "brother" director teams.

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A Serbian Film (REVIEW)

“A Serbian Film” starts off with a young boy inadvertently watching a porn film starring his father and from there it gets worse. So much worse. So bad that by the time the end credits roll that creepy opening scene seems light-hearted in comparison to the waking nightmare you’ve just witnessed. If you are at all considering watching “A Serbian Film” you should be warned that you will see things that you can not unsee and these are things that, for the sake of all that is good and cuddly in the world, I sincerely hope that you most certainly do not want to see.

Skeleton Crew (REVIEW)

It's times like these that I wonder why I even bother with straight-to-video, shot-on-digital horror films at all. Tommi Lepola and Tero Molin's 2009 institutionalized horror outing "Skeleton Crew" is, simply put, more mentally and physically taxing than a root canal performed by a one-armed, lazy-eyed dentist with a penchant for heavy drooling. Although the film lasts a mere 90 minutes, it took me roughly two hours to complete the viewing, due in part to the film's complete inability to hold my attention.

Blackout (REVIEW)

If anyone on the planet expects their gimmicky one-location motion picture to work properly, they'd better make sure it comes equipped with solid direction, great writing, and a smart, likeable cast. Otherwise, you're just going to irritate everyone, and that's never a good thing.

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