found footage

There's a very simple premise behind "Grave Encounters"… take a group of cynical, fraudulent "Ghost Hunters" shooting a terrible reality show, and throw them into a situation where they actually encounter ghosts. It's a format ripe for parody and/or satire, given the dubious nature of most of these shows to begin with. Unfortunately, "Grave Encounters" does little with it beyond the setup, and even worse, adds nothing to the found footage subgenre it so tirelessly apes.

"Paranormal Activity" seemed to spawn a dozen copycats almost overnight with its massive success in 2009. The low budget, haunted house, easy to make found footage format was easily replicable for amateurs and studios alike. "Atrocious" appears at first glance to be a Spanish stylization of the film until its abrupt final twists rip off "The Shining" with such audacity its hard to fathom.

"Paranormal Activity" seemed to spawn a dozen copycats almost overnight with its massive success in 2009. The low budget, haunted house, easy to make found footage format was easily replicable for amateurs and studios alike. "Atrocious" appears at first glance to be a Spanish stylization of the film until its abrupt final twists rip off "The Shining" with such audacity its hard to fathom.

Skew Movie

It’s apparent that the nearly consistent 15 year long presence of “found-footage” and subjective camera POV visual aesthetics in film and television (FFSC from here out) has tapped into a certain type of audio-visual experience that connects with viewers. Though at first glance we could write off these stylistic techniques as cash-grabs it is surprising that the novelty of such techniques has continued to raise more eyebrows in curiosity rather than skepticism.

Chronicle

Jon returns to discuss "Chronicle", plus Liam Neeson gets his own Tumblr

Did this film cheat its viewers? The crew takes a look...

"Now, from the producers of those films you mostly enjoy because they're short and there's nothing else to watch on Halloween, comes the thing no one asked for...

Devil Inside

"Paranormal Activity," a series that has now reached three films with a fourth on the way later this year, put found footage horror in the mainstream. When done well (see here, here or here) the style can produce a transcendent horror experience.

The new year brings the next in a long line of found footage films that are coming our way. Director William Brent Bell of "Stay Alive" fame brings us "The Devil Inside," a movie about demonic possession, religion, science and mental illness.

The found footage horror film is in no way, shape or form a new concept for horror audiences.