heavy metal

Album Review: The Reticent - Le Temps Detruit Tout

Progressive music has been in the midst of a boom in recent years. After a long stretch of time in which being able to play your instrument was deemed unnecessary, and long songs were out of vogue, things have come full circle to an embrace of the reckless creativity that marked the glory age of music. Whether a softer approach as taken by groups like Transatlantic, fully metal statements by the likes of Opeth, or something straddling the fence like Porcupine Tree, more and more bands have accepted the freedom that comes with being progressive.

Album Review: Cryogen - "Psalms of Deceit"

Death metal has, over time, become a uniquely divided sect of the greater heavy metal catalogue. To ask metal fans on each side of the Atlantic what "death metal" should sound like would elicit two wildly different answers. Overseas, death metal is a genre characterized by high-frequency screaming and a veritable avalanche of non-stop guitar. Meanwhile back at the ranch, American death metal is partially infused with the facets of modern hardcore, to produce a sound that shares a relationship with its European cousin, but is marked with guttural growls and heavy-handed distortion.

Album Review: Devilish Impressions - Simulacra

In due time, it's almost a guarantee that every sub-genre of metal will end up blended with every other. Bands like to break new ground, to establish legacies, and being able to claim an entire sub-genre as your progeny is an effective way of doing so. As the combinations are used up, it leaves some interesting amalgamations unexplored. What might at first thought sound like an undesirable experiment, could actually turn out to be a pleasant look into the future.

Album Review: Nile - "At the Gate of Sethu"

I have never been a fan of Nile. I should probably start by saying that.

It seems like I should be. High speed death metal? Check. Ancient Egyptian mythology? Yep. References to H.P Lovecraft? It's got those, too! If Nile could see fit to squeeze in a couple tunes about chocolate cake and the Oakland Raiders, they'd have a bunch of the basic tenets of my personality covered. Yet, it doesn't work for me.

Album Review: Manowar - The Lord Of Steel

Metal is an absurd theater, when you stop and think about it. Much of the music we love is played with unwavering conviction, as though an amplifier turned up high enough can actually transmit the music to the Gods. It sounds stupid, but it's exactly why we become fans, and why we stay involved with the scene, no matter how many people may point and laugh at the more outlandish escapades of our heroes. Metal has a long history of being cheesy, over-the-top, and utterly ridiculous, and no band has ever been so guilty as Manowar.

Album Review: Mortal Infinity - District Destruction

Nothing has been more of a surprise in recent years than the sustained revival of the thrash scene. Thought dead when the classic 80's bands moved on to more commercial styles of music, nostalgia kicked in a generation later, and we find ourselves in the second coming of thrash. The masters are still out there doing their thing, better than they have for decades in many cases, but the influx of new bands is astounding. Thrash has seen a new wave of bands taking up the mantle, spreading the gospel of speed and heaviness around the world once again.

Album Review: Spineshank - "Anger Denial Acceptance"

Six long years. That's how long Spineshank has been away. Nine long years. A near decade has passed since the band's last studio album and subsequent Grammy nomination. On the comeback trail, Spineshank has released "Anger Denial Acceptance," their new record that attempts to encapsulate all the emotions that one experiences after life-altering events.

Album Review: Vampires Everywhere! - "Hellbound and Heartless"

For those who heard “Kiss the Sun Goodbye,” the debut album from Vampires Everywhere!, get that image out of your mind. It is meaningless now, a blip of adolescence that one must stumble through before emerging as a man.

Spineshank and the Long Road Back - A Conversation With Tommy Decker

You remember Spineshank? Almost a decade ago, they were on top, culminating with a Grammy nomination and critical acclaim. Shortly after that though, the band disappeared. Some nine years later, the original lineup is reunited, and the band is healthy, unified and ready to climb the mountain again inch by inch. Drummer Tommy Decker sat down with me to talk about where they've been, what it means to Spineshank to have "Anger Denial Acceptance" releasing right around the corner, and what it's like to persevere as a band.
M.DREW: The first question is the one that needs to be asked the most, which is: it’s been nine years since the last album with the full lineup. How does it feel to be back?

Interview with a Vampire? Words with Michael Vampire of Vampires Everywhere!

Ready to take on the world as part of the Warped Tour, Vampires Everywhere wants you to know that this is not the same band that released their debut album "Kiss the Sun Goodbye." This is a new act, a better act, a stronger act, and they want to introduce you to their new lineup and new sound. Frontman and self-proclaimed vampire Michael Vampire sat down and talked VERY candidly about where his band was, where they are now, what it means to be a vampire, why people are attracted to vampirism, and naturally, "The Lost Boys." Read on:
M.DREW: So, you’re doing prep for the Warped Tour, how amped are you to go out on that?
MICHAEL VAMPIRE: Man, we’re super excited to be on Warped Tour. It’s an honor to have them invite us to play, so we’re really excited about it.
M.D: Who are you most excited to share the stage with?

Around the Web

Syndicate content

What's New?

This week we discuss alchemy, camera technology, a first time guest host joins the show, and we review "As Above, So Below".  

Podcast

Latest Reviews

Search

Around The Web