heavy metal

Witchcraft is a band borne from obscurity that has worked diligently to popularize the musical principles they idolize. Always evolving and forever toiling, Witchcraft has put their nose to the grindstone to bring to the world a nearly lost art; atmospheric, doom-influenced rock in the style of the late seventies and early eighties. We sat down bassist Ola Henriksson to talk about the band, where they've been and how they got there.

The history of heavy metal has seen bands rise from all corners of the earth, but when the numbers are crunched, the majority of bands who have achieved a degree of notoriety come from a select few regions.

There's always a drip of anticipation when putting on a record from a legendary band, even when you have no personal history with them. My Dying Bride had never entered my radar, so even though I knew of their legacy in establishing doom as we know it, my take on the album is with fresh ears.

It was, as Billy Joel famously sang, a pretty good crowd for a Saturday. Worcester, Massachusetts was enjoying the throes of the Rock and Shock Festival, a multi day event that had come down to this: Legacy of Disorder, Cancer Bats, DevilDriver and naturally, GWAR.

Metal Blade Records. Those three words linked together have been a hallmark in heavy metal's vanguard for thirty years. Headed by the agile mind of Brian Slagel, Metal Blade has continually kept their ear to the underground, catapulting handfuls of prominent metal bands into the public eye. GWAR, Cannibal Corpse, Slayer, even the monolith that is Metallica owe some or all of their humble beginnings to Slagel and Metal Blade. They say in sports that the litmus test of a hall of fame member is if it is impossible to tell the history of that sport without mentioning that player. if that same standard holds true for metal, then Metal Blade Records and Brian Slagel are first ballot hall of famers. As his label celebrates its 30th anniversary, we spoke with the founder candidly about his legacy, the track record of his label's success and the changing industry that all labels must adapt to.

For all the talk of rebellion and freedom that metal music purports to stand for, the reality of the situation is that just like every other aspect of the world, metal music is buried as deeply in clichés as anything else.

Okay, here’s a brief, inside look at the life of a music reviewer (dare I call myself a music journalist?) You get inundated with music. Positively deluged. So much so that you realize early on you won’t be able to get to it all, even if you have a staff of twenty writers.

Horror and heavy metal have always had a close association, one that's been accentuated by prolific artists like Alice Cooper and Rob Zombie. Now, add Winds of Plague frontman Johnny Plague into that mix. He's cooked up a entire theme park with Haunted Hollywood Spots that promises thrills and chills for any attendee. I sat down with Johnny and caught up with him about his park, how it came to be, and his love of horror.

In the past twenty-five years, the word ‘goth’ has been assimilated and metamorphosed. In the lexicon of pop culture, the word has come to define things dour and dark; a catch-all for the whims, behaviors and fashions of the misunderstood.

I first heard the name Between The Buried And Me around the time “Alaska” was released. A nascent metal fan delving deeper into the waters, I read as many reviews about as many albums as I could.