heavy metal

Last year was a culture shock for a lot of people, as “50 Shades Of Gray” opened eyes to a world they had no idea existed. Luckily for them, words are a soft initiation into a world they won't be comfortable in.

Following the technically curious remix experiment that was “American Tradgedy Redux,” I resolved to give Hollywood Undead another shot.

I remember hearing about Riverside when their first album was just coming out. I wasn't yet interested in progressive music, but there was enough buzz about them that they were always in the back of my mind.

You can't trust a musician to tell you the truth. It's a simple thing to keep in mind, but we idolize our favorite players so much that it's often difficult to remember proper perspective.

For more than a decade, Otep Shamaya has played several parts in the metalsphere: rebel, lightning rod, provocateur.

Over the course of the last year or so, two themes have stood out to me as I take in as much of the music scene as I can; 1) progressive music has come out of the shadows, and 2) vintage sounds have become more than merely a gimmick.

Now here’s an interesting emergence. Creeper, emerging from the greater Dallas market, is a metal act billing itself as traditional metal.

As a new year is at its dawn, a wellspring of hope and optimism will once again flourish, the belief that the coming year will be better than the last. It's natural to think that things will get better, that something grand and great will be coming down the line to lift our spirits.

This year proved to be an interesting one for me as a music fan, and not just because it marked my official foray into the world of criticism. After a few albums in the last several years began the trend, this was the year that prog became a larger presence in my listening. While not all of them will appear in the following list, there were more prog albums I enjoyed than any other subset of rock and metal, a fact that caugth me off guard. But when confronted with solid albums from bands like The Flower Kings and Affector, which didn't even make the list, and followed up on with those that did qualify, it was a banner year for prog. None of the albums will top my list, as Dream Theater did last year with their incredible “A Dramatic Turn Of Events”, but this year was defined, in my mind, by prog.

To begin our week capping off the musical year that was in 2012, Chris and I decided the first thing we should do was sit down and figure out what this year was, what its trends were, what it means for the future, and who the superstars were. We had come from two very different 2012’s in metal (if you haven’t noticed, we have different tastes,) so we decided to get some things down and see if a lengthy discussion couldn’t iron out what the final verdict of the year was. Also, we named the BloodyGoodHorror.com Album of the Year, so you’ll be sure to want to see what our pick was. Read on for the spectacle that was M.Drew/Chris C II!