heavy metal

Earlier this week I talked about Rogga Johansson's Megascavenger, and here we are a few dyas later discussing yet another of his projects.

It wasn't that long ago I was reviewing Revolting's “Hymns Of Ghastly Horror”, the latest album from the latest band culled from the never-ending death metal mind of Rogga Johansson.

Sons of Aeon is a sort of death metal supergroup, born from active parts of Ghost Brigade, Swallow the Sun and a couple others. In pre-release press, the band says all the right things, talking about the influence of death metal pioneers like Bolt Thrower and Napalm Death.

Take a look at that cover art. Look at it again. One more time. If you are left with any uncertainty whatsoever as to the kind of heavy metal album that Sonic Pulse has released, then you simply are being myopic.

One of the things that irritates me about the metal scene is the habit of making everything sound like a bigger deal than it really is. I'm referring mostly to the incessant need to label any project that features people who have been in other bands as a 'supergroup'.

Progressive music walks a fine line for most of its existence, trying to balance the gratification musicians garner from playing difficult and involved compositions with the gratification listeners need to be able to elicit from those same songs.

You remember Ron Dayne? For those who don’t, Ron Dayne was a running back from the University of Wisconsin, who won the 1999 Heisman Trophy and became the first round pick of the New York Giants in the April 2000 NFL Draft.

If you are a heavy metal fan, Motörhead’s live show is one of those pinnacle “must-haves.” While Lemmy and his cohorts continue to insist that they are nothing more than a rock and roll band, seeing Motörhead live is watching a living oral history of the genesis of heavy metal.

It's hard to remember sometimes that music is in fact art, and the songs and albums we listen to are supposed to be artistic expressions of the people who create them.

Every genre, it seems, has its own sense of nostalgia. As the classic bands of every facet of metal continue to chug along, and in many cases find more success than they've had in decades, a new wave of bands is popping up, using the classics as more than merely an inspiration.