heavy metal

In the annuls of heavy metal, I don't know if there has been anyone more frustrating to be a fan of than Dave Mustaine.

Despite all its loudly orated trappings to the contrary, metal is very much a genre that embraces the ideas of tradition and legacy. This really isn’t that surprising; all counter cultures recognize their own, and scrutinize members’ inclusion based on a selection of worthy criteria.

Every generation needs an AC/DC. Despite losing their original lead singer, Bon Scott, in 1980, AC/DC has managed to hang around for a few generations thanks to replacement Brian Johnson.

I have a lot of respect for bands that know when the time is right to walk away. Far too often we see bands that cling onto life, churning out albums and tours for no other reason than because they know no other life.

There are a lot of aspects of the current rock and metal scenes that I just don't understand. Unless a band fashions themselves as a throwback to the past, there is a gravitational pull to include ever increasing amounts of extreme elements into what used to be normal rock.

Brooklyn, New York, for a long time, was one of the foremost scenes in all of heavy metal. Generally characterized in alternating turns by sludge, sleaze, doom and camaraderie, the city gave rise to some of the most influential metal acts of the '80s and '90s. Chief among them were Type O Negative and Life of Agony, both acts featuring New York veteran Sal Abruscato. Sal has returned with a band all his own, releasing a second album with A Pale Hose Named Death, and hopes to keep the spirit of Brooklyn metal alive. Here to discuss his album, his band, his history and pizza, is Sal Abruscato.

In 2009, vocalist and guitarist Toby Wright formed Age of Taurus as a one-man studio project. After self-releasing the demo “In the Days of the Taurean Empire” in 2010, Wright’s project quickly grew in popularity and received numerous stellar reviews.

We’ve been talking a lot lately about the revival in traditional metal and the rise of bands that embody the blues-doom spirit.

It would have been hard to imagine, not too long ago, that Queensrÿche would once again be one of the biggest stories in the world of metal.

Leprous is one of those bands I should be more familiar with than I am. Their last album, “Bilateral”, won massive acclaim from all around the metal world, but for reasons I'm not sure of, I never got around to listening to it.