album review

What to make of a comeback album from a band sixteen years gone?

In what has been a great year for vintage styled rock can roll, we keep adding to the list of releases taking us back in time to the days when rock and roll still had a raw and youthful energy behind it.

Every now and again, I’m faced with an album that I don’t quite know how to decipher, or how to react. It is a bittersweet experience to be sure; the joined sensation of exposure to something totally new which also makes you consider how much you’ve ever really known about music.

It annoys me when rock and metal fans use the word 'pop' as an insult, acerbically spitting the words through snarled lips.

Sometimes all we want is for an album to come along and kick our ass. That is, in essence, what heavy metal has always been about, at least since the bands that were initially spawned from the days of Black Sabbath came to life.

There's something to be said for bands taking grand risks.

There are times in a band's career when they need a shock to the system. For whatever reason, they get stuck in a rut and lose the spark that made them what they were. Fans can hear it, and when that happens, the critics begin to grow louder.

What a surprise out of left field. When you look at Skeletal Remains album “Beyond the Flesh” and consider the name of the band combines with the album cover’s Cannibal Corpse motif, you think you know what you’re getting.

When you think of women in rock, the number of names that come to mind is small. When you think of women in metal, that number shrinks further. And when you think of women in metal who have been able to survive for twenty five years, one name comes to mind; Doro.

What makes Dethklok unique among gimmick bands (which is not an insult, merely a fact,) is that the “band” plays the role totally straight.