album review

If you spend enough time listening to a narrow band of music, you will eventually hear everything. Not literally, of course, but you will hear so much music that fits into the same small box of cliches that nothing short of a revolution will be able to catch you off-guard anymore.

Just read the press release for Mothership and you’ll learn there’s a lot to like about this band. (And for clarity’s sake, let’s get one thing out of the way; this band has nothing to do with George Clinton.) There are the stock-in-trade quotes about what the band is and what they want to be.

“While there are many bands in the hard rock/metal world that like to play with fire, it requires a certain combination of insanity and balls to douse yourself in it.” This opening line of Psychothermia’s biography from the band’s website is certainly true, but if you’re going to play with real

Melodic death metal is one of those things that, if you listen to a purist, will tell you cannot exist. Death metal, they say, is incompatible with the melodic elements other facets of the metal universe take for granted.

Okay kids, gather round. It’s confession time.

In many ways, nothing has changed in all the years rock music has been around. Especially in the world of progressive rock, the past is the past, the present, and the future.

Red Bull has done a phenomenal job of making their name synonymous with “energy” and with Red Bull Records, energy is exactly what listeners receive.

Cults are bad things, or so we are told. The connotation that comes packaged with the word is one of evil, the occult, and brainwashed minions blindly following their leader.

When entering blindly into an album, the descriptions we use to categorize the music we hear aren't always good enough.

Texas hardly seems like a hotbed for progressive or technical death metal, but rising from the Lone Star State is Vex, a band that would sound more at home among the ranks of Darkthrone or Absu than Pantera.