album review

Doom bands have a struggle on their hands. Not with their fans, who love and crave the slumbering behemoths that pour out of speakers like cold molasses. No, the problem is with people like me, who may have only a passing interest in doom.

We’ve discussed on these pages before the talent of Wes Borland and the underground metal community’s grudging respect for the sole interesting member of Limp Bizkit.

The proliferation of media means that bands can't merely be bands anymore. Everyone needs some sort of a gimmick, whether it be sound or image.

One of the greatest benefits that has come about as a result of the shifting nature of the music business is the establishment of a relative meritocracy.

Fozzy is a band that has no right being successful.

There's something about the Viking heritage that makes every bit of music that plays off it seem larger than life.

We sometimes forget that a song is a larger entity than what we hear when we put on a record or turn on the radio. The things we are familiar with are not songs, they are performances, interpretations of something bigger than can be expressed through sound.

Among the dozens of factors that can impact the effect music has on us, geography cannot be ignored. Whether its the pull of a hometown act, or the joy in discovering music you love that comes from a world away, it does matter where the music we listen to comes from.

As the 90's drew to a close, the state of rock music was slipping into a state of decay. It was lazy to conflate all modern rock bands, sentencing them to live under the title 'post-grunge', but there was always a grain of truth to be found in the stereotype.

Testament has managed a remarkable feat; they have spent their entire career one step into the shadows. During the 80's, the natural cutoff for establishing the group of thrash bands at the top of the heap left them one step away from immortality, despite their sales success.