david cronenberg

The year was 1993. A pale, chubby, awkward, nerdy boy with nary a whisker in sight was visiting the Universal Studios Orlando Resort with his family. While there said boy witnessed none other than “Ghostbusters Live” and traveled down a dinosaur’s gullet in the “Back to the Future” ride, both of which that now bearded still awkward man remembers clearly. But the pièce de résistance was a Horror themed makeup show in which two hosts vying for Penn and Teller level displays of misdirection and illusion demonstrated a variety of special effect techniques.

Videodrome is one of the best critiques of cat videos before cat videos were a thing. In David Cronenberg's follow-up to “Scanners” the writer and director solidified his cinematic voice addressing similar themes with a breadth of scale and a visionary perception of the place of new technologies in the public and private. Where in his previous feature a climatic sequence represented some sort of proto-internet telepath hack, Videodrome takes for its very focus the intrusion of malicious programming in domestic spaces and a collective consciousness.

Eclipsed by countless cultural references to a certain erupting cranium, Scanners seems to have transformed from movie into punch line. With a plot that’s part 1970s conspiracy theory, man-on-the-run flick and part new age pseudo-science exploration it’s possible to think Scanners might have been forgotten to a soup of generic ripoffs, carbon copies, and pastiches. But David Cronenberg’s follow up to “The Brood” gives us our first clear indication of the social scale Cronenberg begins to tackle as a filmmaker.

For many years, fans of Clive Barker's Nightbreed have clamored for the release of the "Cabal Cut", a cut that supposedly adheres more closely to Barker's original vision for the film. That cut has finally seen the light of day in the form of Nightbreed: The Director's Cut, but it's unclear if the "upgrade" has made much of a difference in terms of overall quality.

The days grow shorter as the calendar ticks upwards, and we move further into October! We're only two days in to the 31 Days of Horror, but Casey's already starting to feel a little wormy. Does he have what it takes to make it the distance?

More often than not, the subject of a horror film will tap into some outlandish, otherworldly, or supernatural elements, eschewing the fears of the real world for the more heightened terror of fantasy. There are the rare occasions (and rare filmmakers) who are resolutely planted in the world of real-life horror, frightening stories that may not have happened, but certainly could. Director David Cronenberg is the reigning king of this type of film.

Jim Isaac began his career in film the same way that many horror filmmakers do, by working in the world of effects. Like Robert Kurtzman and Chris Walas (with whom Isaac would later work on “The Fly”), other effects gurus who made the move up to director, Jim Isaac began as a creature technician in films such as “Return of the Jedi” and “Gremlins”.

I'm just going to come right out and say it. I don't get why people go ape shit for David Cronenberg's "Scanners". Yeah a guy's head explodes but that's within the first 15 minutes of the movie. Then there's another 167 (rough guess) of talking to sit through. None the less the 1981 film is finding its way onto a special edition Blu-Ray on April 8, 2013 and will be packaged with all kinds of special features for you to enjoy. Enjoy them as much as 647 minutes (rough guess) of people talking about something I don't honestly remember.

Apparently the Guillermo del Toro produced flick "Mama" did pretty well at the box office because not only is it being considered for a sequel but possibly even a franchise. I like to think there could even be spin offs in the future. "Dada" for instance. And then of course the wacky "Uncle Buck". Didn't see that coming did you.

The little screens adaptation of Stephen King's "Under the Dome" has landed itself Rachelle Lefevre as it's leading lady. For those of you not familiar with her work she was in one, and possibly all, of the "Twilight" movies so that makes her a big time movie screen person. That's a thing, I know it.

Remember Orlando Jones? He was in those Sprite commercials and then that movie with the guy from "X-Files" where aliens invade and then he was the weird hologram guy in "The Time Machine". I know I love him too. And now he's been cast in "Sleepy Hollow", a new show coming to Fox which is said to be a modern day take on the classic tale. I'm not joking either. I really do like him. I think he's super.