Book Review

Book Review: Joe Hill's HORNS

Joe Hill’s 2010 novel, Horns is one hell of a trip.

Amy Cross’ The Night Girl,follows Juliet in her pre-college blues as she reluctantly takes a job at the Crestview retirement home. Instinctually bored, Juliet seeks out the nooks and crannies of the rundown facility and finds someone that has been waiting for her for quite sometime. When Juliet meets Jennifer Mathis, she doesn’t believe she’s a ghost, she doesn’t even believe that she’s real. After a few treacherous graveyard shifts, Juliet realizes that regardless of what Jennifer is, she has several skills that are very handy for Juliet.

I feel need to preface this with the fact that I found Tamara Thorne’s book and took a chance because it mentioned witches and I've been on an AHS: Coven kick...Unfortunately, my senses were way off and that proved to be a terrible chance. I don’t really like cheerleaders or sororities unless they are followed by massacres and this book has none of those.

Since I was late on the Best Books of 2013, and the fact that the majority of the books I read last year weren’t published in ’13 - a short list for some interesting early 2014 releases seemed more appropriate.

Snowblind, Christopher Golden - January, 21

Not since way back in 2006 – when I stumbled onto Mark Danielewski’s House of Leaves – have I been so engrossed by the world of a book as I was by Marisha Pessl’s Night Film. Now, I’m not saying it’s as arrestingly visual, intricately woven, or labyrinthine as Leaves, but it’s still an expertly crafted neo noir tale of mystery and death. Had the mighty Alfred Hitchcock tried his hand at the written word, he might’ve given us something akin to Night Film.

Scott Nicholson’s The Red Church builds its foundation on southern ghost stories. Shadowed by the ancient Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, a church was constructed in the late 19th century. Unfortunately for the Reverend Wendell McFall, whose fanatical ravings of God’s Second Son required the sacrifice of a child, the red church required his own sacrifice as well. Hung out on tree framing the front door of the church, Reverend Wendell McFall became a Halloween legend. A ghost story passed from generation to generation as the red church stands as foreboding as ever.

Revisiting his old ways, Stephen King’s newest novel, Joyland has the heart of that disenchanted college youth you once were and the fun you were bound to have in spite of your looming shortcomings.Joyland is a quick read that ticks you slowly up the top of that rickety rollercoaster just to plummet you headfirst into unseen curves and humps. A nostalgic ride through a lost summer, a first love, a mysterious new place and the sweat of a summer job, King haunts you with things you’ve tried to forget and then those things you yearn to remember.

Geddy’s Moon is John Mulhall’s debut novel, which he began working on over twenty years ago as a teenager. This tidbit of knowledge is extremely important, as all his efforts and years poured into this project definitely paid off tenfold.

Red Rain is RL Stine’s baby step from children’s bedtime terrors to adult horror. Based around Lea Sutter, a fledging travel writer, who decides against severe weather warnings to visit the mysterious island of Cape Le Chat Noir, off the coast of South Carolina. After witnessing a long practiced and popular reincarnation ritual, Lea is stranded at a local’s house while a terrible hurricane devastates the entire island. In the aftermath of the storm, Lea spots two beautiful, orphaned twin boys.

JG Ballard spares no detail of the human fascination with sex, violence, and death in his novel Crash. Navigating the crowded technological highway of civilization, Ballard graphically implores the emphasis of technology and it’s replacing of human interaction. Desperate for emotional and physical connections, Ballard’s characters neurotically obsess over the pain and scars that car collisions leave on their flesh, as well as the sexual symmetry of the event itself.