arch enemy

Arch Enemy is one of those bands whose career can be broken down into segments and viewed individually by vocalist. It all began with Johan Liiva, the grating grunter who teamed up with the brothers Arnott and brought the band to worldwide fame.

The Raven

If a 19th-century serial killer/detective story based on the genre writing of Edgar Allen Poe feels like a weird match for a director whose previous credits include "Ninja Assassin" and work on virtually every Wachowski Brothers film, then director James McTeigue would probably suggest you take a pass on "The Raven." Likely imagined as a mix between Depp's "From Hell" and the Downey Jr "Sherlock Holmes" films, McTeigue's John Cusak vehicle manages to impersonate neither of those films well enough to pass muster.

After the release of the comparatively successful “Root of All Evil,” it became evident from the fans’ clawing that they wanted new material from Arch Enemy, and they wanted it fast. That album’s re-recordings of early AE songs was a fun romp, but only served to whet the crowd’s appetite.

*Camp OZZY will be releasing a 30th anniversary remastered edition of "Blizzard of Ozz" and "Diary of a Madman." The two will release on May 31st in multiple editions, and will be available on CD or vinyl.

Here's a brief smattering of things to catch you all up on!

I had never before been to the Palladium in Worcester (and yes, it’s pronounces wuss-ter,) but I must say I was fundamentally impressed with the place. I’m a sucker for metal venues that clearly used to be performance theatres back in the day, and the Palladium did not disappoint.

Arch Enemy’s “The Root of All Evil” is an interesting study. It has all the tenets of typical European death metal fare, but at its darkened and fiery center beats an irrepressible heart of old-school thrash.