home invasion

Horror filmmakers have a unique opportunity. Wtih several subgenres at their disposal they have the option to morph any franchise into a completely different experience. However, it can be tricky for a well-established series to step outside of its norm and explore a different area of horror. With risk can come great reward, though, and Johannes Roberts' sequel to 2008's The Strangers is a clear-cut deviation from the home invasion subgenre that introduced us to the three masked psychopaths.

Goths, baseball, crossbows and the Netflix thriller "Hush".

As sub genres reach the end of their ropes and the tropes become tired, new films have two choices to make to be successful. One, they can approach the concept with an indulgent tone and create an over the top massacre of the senses. Two, acknowledge the audiences exhaustion with the tropes and create a meta commentary concept. Last years “Evil Dead” remake opted for the first choice by making a balls out gore fest that gave a loving nudge to the cabin in the woods sub genre from where it was conceived.

Find out why Schnaars' new nickname is "The Polite Stranger"...

As a social allegory, “The Purge” is about as subtle as Hulk Hogan being interviewed by Mean Gene Okerlund. This movie slaps you across the face again and again with its statements on class divisions in America, the flaws with our media outlets, and our cultural obsession with violence. Despite this rather large flaw, however, “The Purge” is not a half-bad movie, with a decent plot, and enough suspense to warrant a viewing.

I can’t really talk about this movie without spoiling it, so if you have any interest in watching "La Casa Muda", or the 2012 remake "Silent House", which I am guessing are fairly similar, I’d suggest not reading this review before you watch the film.

Silent House

Though it feels like it's been much longer, audiences have been subjected to marketing campaigns built around the concept of 3D-as-experience since at least 2009. Which is why it was both refreshing and a bit surprising when trailers began to roll out for "Silent House" built not around that now-tired theater gimmick but instead around the concept of "real-time horror." Commercials and materials have been up-front about the fact that the film is presented in one, uncut take.

The current trend toward remakes, reboots, and spin-offs has been with mainstream cinema for nigh on a decade. And with this tendency comes a host of voices declaring a creatively bankrupt and psychologically shallow cinema straining to keep up with digital media and the Internet. This weekend alone saw the release of “The Thing” and “Footloose.” But while I have rolled my eyes at more of these types of films than actually enjoyed them I do think it is a dismissive gesture to assume these films are merely quick cash grabs.

The second episode of "American Horror Story" was chock full of further character development, a ton of questions of who's living and who's dead and a very "Strangers-esque" style home invasion mixed with a bit of cult like murder.

George Romero’s earliest pictures strike that wonderful balance of achieving both crowd-pleasing cult sensations as well as academic and journalistic esteem. While Romero may be inseparable from popular zombie-dom* it is his 1976 “vampire” film “Martin” that represents one of his most surprisingly sincere, character driven films, making use of horror conventions as a frame for a truly unique take on the relationship between the monstrous, horrific, and social world.