WTF?!

"Paranormal Activity: The Chronology" gives us the thing approximately no one asked for

"Now, from the producers of those films you mostly enjoy because they're short and there's nothing else to watch on Halloween, comes the thing no one asked for... all three films in the series, edited together in chronological order!" Even as a "Paranormal Activity" fan, I can't imagine who would want to see all three films cut together, "never before seen footage" or not. You'll see me at a three day long "Lord of the Rings" marathon before you see me watching this. It's being used as a promotional tool for the series release on "Bluray" and Digital Download.

Episode 167 - "Shivers"

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This week it's time for Jon's staff pick, David Cronenberg's "Shivers". We talk about orgies, parasites, and Disco Stu...

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Silent Night, Bloody Night (REVIEW)

I’m going to hazard a guess here and say that if you are a regular reader of this website, chances are somewhere in the depths of your DVD collection you have at least one of those DVD sets with multiple horror “classics” packed on a handful of DVDs. It’s happened to all of us – you see a few titles you recognize, a few more that have to be watchable (“Werewolf in a Girl’s Dormitory” anybody?), and hey, who doesn’t need a seventh copy of “Night of the Living Dead”? I’ll also guess that you watched no more than three of the movies before realizing that murky VHS transfers of rightly forgotten movies maybe wasn’t the best ten dollars you ever spent. If you’re looking for some holiday-themed horror this Christmas you might want to blow the dust off that box set and see if it has “Silent Night, Bloody Night”, a gothic proto-slasher that beat seasonal classic “Black Christmas” to the punch by a couple of years.

Dear Mr. Gacy (REVIEW)

There’s a fascination with serial killers that runs through us all. You could turn on your television right now and it probably wouldn’t take long to find a program about a serial killer, be it a detective drama, a documentary, a tabloid show, a movie or maybe even the news. For most of us the fascination only runs deep enough to watch them on tv or read a book about them, but there is a subgroup of people who are so enthralled with real life killers that they want to connect with them. You hear anecdotal stories all the time about mass murderers who get fan mail, photographs and marriage proposals while incarcerated but “Dear Mr. Gacy” is the true story of a boy who made more of a connection with a notorious murderer than he ever could have dreamed.

Episode 144 - "The Poughkeepsie Tapes"

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We're all creeped out by this movie... and "brother" director teams.

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Trash Humpers (REVIEW)

Beautiful, disparaging, vulgar, transcendent, fatuous, and recondite; Harmony Korine’s “Gummo” persists as one of the most challenging and infuriating works of American cinema in the last two decades. For those who haven’t seen it the film fuses contemporary post-apocalyptic aesthetics with mockumentary, documentary, and exploitation to non-narratively detail the real world horrors and triumphs that unfold in a small Midwestern town devastated by poverty. And that doesn’t even begin to describe the feeling of watching “Gummo”.

Episode 143 - "Skyline"

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Aliens are sucking people into the sky, while this movie is sucks the intelligence from your brain.

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Zombie Christ (REVIEW)

If you watch enough low budget horror movies you start to ask yourself if the people making these films actually think they're making art or they're just trying to get girls naked on film. "Zombie Christ" is that kind of movie and after watching it I'm 99% sure I know what the answer is. Alright to be fair this movie may have also been made to get someone's friend's band in a film. In any case, mission accomplished.

White Dog (REVIEW)

When director Samuel Fuller was wrapping up filming on “White Dog” in 1982, Paramount Pictures became concerned that the film could offend black audiences and sent two consultants to review the film. One of the consultants considered the film inflammatory and offensive and two weeks before the end of filming Fuller was given a list of changes to be made to the movie. In the end, Paramount chose not to give the film an American theatrical release. It wouldn’t receive an official release until 2008, when the Criterion Collection released a special edition DVD of the film. Insulted by the experience, Fuller, one of the most acclaimed genre directors of the 20th century, moved to France and never made another American film.

Episode 135 - "A Serbian Film"

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