sequel

I've got a lot of nostalgia for movies like "The Ring" and "The Grudge." I didn't really grow up with horror movies, so at the time these came out, "horror" basically meant: "I Know What You Did Last Summer" movies, the later and more embarrassing sequels of "Halloween," and a whole host of "Scream" knock-offs.

Texas Chainsaw 3D

As with many of its 70's horror franchise contemporaries, "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" has become a series whose present continues to lose connection with its past, even as new entries stumble over themselves to pay homage to their roots. In 1974, Tobe Hooper and Kim Henkel captured lightning in a bottle with a chaotic, nasty film about a family of cannibals living deep in the heart of Texas.

"The Human Centipede" became the unlikeliest of cultural memes when it surfaced back in 2009. From hipster art projects on Etsy to an episode of South Park, "Centipede" was the movie that nearly everyone seemed to know about but only a handful had actually seen.

I love gimmickry in films. More specifically, I love it when filmmakers (or a marketing department) make aesthetic choices on the inclining that maybe we will chuck a few more dollars their way. And I don’t mean this in that snarky, cynical, cinema is a beautiful unique snowflake-unicorn kind of way. Sure, what starts as a gimmick can quickly become convention and open up new and interesting ways to tell a story or convey an idea.

In every way that matters to the people responsible, “Resident Evil: Afterlife” is a resounding success. Thanks to the extra ‘3D tax’ on ticket prices, it had the strongest opening weekend and per-screen average in the history of Paul W. S. Anderson’s franchise. Though “Afterlife,” like 2007’s “Extinction” before it, was touted as the last film in the series, planning on a fifth film is underway.