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Retro Poster: "A Bucket of Blood" (1959)

Ok, so i absolutely love Roger Corman's horror comedy, "A Bucket of Blood," about an awkward busboy who accidentally kills his landlady's cat and covers it up by wrapping it in plaster. Soon after, he is pressured to produce more pieces of art and turns to human subjects. (Insert evil laughter here). If you haven't seen this make sure you get the original and not the remake starring Anthony Michael Hall and Justine Bateman... you've been warned.

Retro Poster: "White Zombie" (1932)

Made in just 11 days back in 1932 on a $50,000 budget, "White Zombie" tells the story of a woman (Madge Bellamy) who turns into a zombie at the hands of a voodoo priest (Bela Lugosi). Although the film opened to negative reviews, it has become a favorite to many fans of the horror genre, gaining much of its recognition as being the first feature length zombie film. Although the story line is a bit over the top, the film oozes with atmosphere and eerie camera shots of the zombies, who are basically mindless drones doing slave labor. This one is available streaming instantly on Netflix.

Retro Poster: "Mad Monster Party" (1967)

Boris Karloff and Phyllis Diller both lend their voices to the claymation horror comedy "Mad Monster Party". Dr Frankenstein invites a bunch of monsters (including Dracula, The Creature From The Black Lagoon, Frankenstein, and The Wolf Man, to name a few) to his retirement party where he plans announce his successor, his nephew Felix. If you liked the Rankin and Bass holiday movies from the 60s and 70s, (Rudolph!!!) then it's pretty safe to assume that you will enjoy this forgotten gem. Filled with kooky monster fights, humor and catchy songs, it's worth a look for nostalgia's sake.

Retro Poster: "Spider Baby" (1968)

In writer and director Jack Hill's cult classic "Spider Baby", we are introduced to the three Merrye children, Elizabeth (Beverly Washburn), Virginia (Jill Banner) and Ralph (Sid Haig), who suffer from a genetic condition that causes its victims to mentally, socially and physically regress into primitive, murderous cannibals. Lon Chaney Jr. plays caretaker Bruno, who has managed to keep the children out of harms way and maintain the family secret.

Retro Poster: "Strait-Jacket" (1964)

"Lucy Harbin was declared legally insane today," narrates a voice during the opening sequence of the 1964 film "Strait-Jacket." Directed by William Castle, "Strait-Jacket" is a fun little gem about a scorned wife, Lucy Harbin (Joan Crawford) who hacks up her husband and his mistress with an axe in front of her 3 year old daughter. 20 years later, after being released from a mental hospital, suspicions begin to arise about her behavior. If you haven't yet seen this one, it's available on Netflix, packaged as a double feature with another William Castle flick, "Homicidal."

Retro Poster: "Teeth" (2007)

Many horror films are derived from a classic myth or legend and in that sense, "Teeth" is no different. "Teeth" tackles the myth of "vagina dentata" in the coming of age story of virginal teenager Dawn (Jess Weixler), who discovers that her vagina has teeth. Written and directed by Mitchell Lichtenstein, Dawn realizes that her difference in anatomy can actually be a physical advantage over men. Don't let the heavy subject matter scare you; the film doesn't take itself too seriously.

Retro Poster: "Freaks" (1932)

Tod Browning's "Freaks" is a film centered around the beautiful trapeze artist Cleopatra (Olga Baclanova), who schemes with her lover, Hercules (Henry Victor), to seduce and marry a circus sideshow midget, Hans (Harry Earles), in order to obtain his large inheritance. The film depicts the so-called "freaks" in a sympathetic and human manner, while showing the most cruel and monstrous sides of the "normal" characters.

Retro Poster: "The Hound of The Baskervilles" (1939)

History's most famous detective made a major comeback this weekend with "Sherlock Holmes", and an opening weekend box office take to the tune of $65 million. Robert Downey Jr. is the current inhabitant of the role, but it was 1939's "The Hounds of Baskervilles" that catapulted the anti-hero that we know today into pop culture lore. In this case Holmes was played by Basil Rathbone, who over the course of his career would play the sleuth 13 times. In "Baskervilles", Holmes uncovers a plot to have a Nobleman killed by a "terrible trained hound".

Retro Poster: "Silent Night, Deadly Night"

It wasn't the first Christmas themed horror film, but "Silent Night, Deadly Night" would prove to be the most controversial upon its wide release in 1984. Director Charles E. Sellier Jr.'s slasher film caused quite a stir with its provocative promotional campaign. Not only did the national PTA fight to have it pulled from theaters due to the potentially scarring image of a killer Santa, the film was given the best reward an exploitation film could hope for, a condemnation by Siskel and Ebert. It was so controversial in the UK, that it wasn't officially released there until 2009.

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This week we discuss alchemy, camera technology, a first time guest host joins the show, and we review "As Above, So Below".  

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