indie horror

Is it wrong that I don't find anything creepy about the main charter in the new film "Catfish"? Sometime you've just got to find a girl on Facebook, start putting yourself in pictures with her and eventually drive across the country to surprise her in the middle of the night. Sounds romantic to me. And to the rest of America apparently because this film is blowing up everywhere. Apparently even Kelly Ripa wants to see it. She's my favorite of all the Ripa's!

Whenever I sit down to review low-budget independent horror movies, especially those released by cult distributor Brain Damage Films, I make an honest, concentrated effort not to hold them to the same standards as their Hollywood-generated brethren. Less-than-stellar acting, wonky direction, and cheap special effects are almost always par for the course, and for the most part, they're relatively easy to overlook. Assuming, of course, that the project in question comes packaged with a decent story and a director who understands the limitations of his budget.

Anyone who has suffered through any of my reviews on this site is probably aware of the fact that modern mainstream horror and I simply do not get along. In fact, I'm so brutally disenchanted with the genre right now that I often wonder why, exactly, I continue to waste my precious time and remaining brain cells on films that do nothing more than insult my intelligence. Perhaps this jaded point-of-view is true source of my recent cinematic funk, derailing the respective experiences long before the opening credits begin to roll.

There's been a lot of buzz around the film "The House Of The Devil" and after showing at numerous festival it finally gets a release date this weekend, even if it is a limited one. So in honor of that the writer and director of the film, Ti West, will take part in a live twitter chat this coming Thursday from 11 to 12pm PST. Question one, what the hell kind of name is Ti? From there I am pretty open.

This week we take on "Paranormal Activity", and see whose pants were dry after watching it.

This British horror film "Knife Edge" reminds me of a couple of different movies I've seen before. Hmmm... I'm thinking "The Shining" mixed with "The Others", with a splash of "The Grudge"? That's either a recipe for a shit sandwich or a decent little thriller, and to be honest I really can't tell. I would give this a spin though, what about you guys?

Generally speaking, I am not a fan of children. And, as far as I can tell, they don't care much for me, either. If these overprotected, misguided miscreants aren't pre-packaged from birth with some sort of mental or physical abnormality, you can rest assured that their parents are complete and total nutters who are a few signatures short of an extended psychiatric vacation. As harsh and detached as these words may initially appear, there's a part of you that knows I'm right.

For those of us who weren't lucky enough to catch one of the limited midnight screenings that have occurred in the last few weeks, today will be our first chance to see "Paranormal Activity". I was finally able to confirm last night through that my local theaters will indeed be carrying the film. So, after lunch today with an old co-worker, I'll be checking this out on the big screen.

During the Halloween season, the onslaught of horror films are as inevitable as Tony Romo throwing an interception, especially with the recent success of "Paranormal Activity." Usually, more horror makes me happy, but it just doesn't seem fitting that a film set at the Grand Canyon during the summer would be the perfect film for the oncoming winter. Even if it does have ridiculous looking CGI wolves, it has some pretty fancy actors and a great setting for a horror story.

I'm not sure we could call "Nightbeasts" a "Shriek Of The Mutilated" remake but I don't think it would be unfair to call it a tribute. Sure the quality of the monsters has improved but the editing seems to not have gotten much better. Take a look at the trailer below and see for yourself.

Zach Galligan, AKA the guy from "Gremlins" stars as a father who's sets out on a weekend hunting trip with his son and runs into those darn sasquatches. Wes Sullivan, who worked for years as an animator for Disney wrote and directed "Nightbeasts".