heavy metal

The dust has settled from the release of Lazarus A.D.'s sophomore effort, "Black Rivers Flow." After a tour that took the band all across the United States and Europe, the band has a little time off before striking out on a headlining tour in a couple weeks. Vocalist and bassist Jeff Paulick took some time out to talk with Bloody Good Horror. The refreshingly candid frontman gives us his thoughts on the band, their new album, Metallica, dance music, the state of heavy metal, the music business, horror cinema and sports allegiances in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Suffice it to say, we covered a lot of ground in our conversation.

After the release of the comparatively successful “Root of All Evil,” it became evident from the fans’ clawing that they wanted new material from Arch Enemy, and they wanted it fast. That album’s re-recordings of early AE songs was a fun romp, but only served to whet the crowd’s appetite.

So, “Khaos Legions” comes barreling out of the din, the first new studio material from the band since 2007’s “Rise of the Tyrant” which landed to generally positive but ultimately mixed reviews.

It’s been a long road for Tennessee’s Straight Line Stitch, from limited releases to changing lineups to grueling tours in dirty clubs. Now tapped to play as part of the Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Festival, the band feels like they’re come over a crest in their career. Taking a minute off from promoting their new album “The Fight of Our Lives,” singer Alexis Brown talked with me about music, women in heavy metal, and a copious amount of horror cinema.

Over all the years, projects, lineups, albums and EPs, Chris Reifert has become nothing if not the picture of consistency. Reunited with original Autopsy members Danny Coralles and Eric Cutler, and joined by Joe Trevisano of Abscess, Autopsy has released “Macabre Eternal,” the band’s latest unapologetic assault on musical convention, trend and quite possibly good taste.

Huh. *shrug*

That’s my reaction to Gallhammer’s new album, “The End.” Cut down from three members to two after the departure of Mika Penetrator, the all-girl Japanese metal band has set out to try and push the boundaries of black and doom metal.

What’s become clear about Gallhammer over their existence is that front woman Vivian Slaughter does not give a damn about image, convention or traditional roles. She and the band are much more preoccupied with musical atmosphere and trolling the deep corners and shadowy depths of doom metal.

Red Fang’s sophomore effort “Murder the Mountains” is a wonderfully experimental, anything-goes affair that approaches the mores of kick-ass rock and roll with open eyes and robust vitality.

A product of musically oft-overlooked Portland, Oregon, Red Fang inked a deal with reprise Records, and was immediately paired with known producer Chris Funk. Funk’s previous experience with the Decemberists raises some eyebrows, but his steady hand makes a difference on the overall consistency of “Murder the Mountains” without changing the music’s intent.

It seemed somehow appropriate that a crowd had gathered for a Danzig show on what Edward Bulwer-Lytton once called "a dark and stormy night." As the winds howled and raged and rain pounded upon gathered concertgoers awaiting admittance, those inside were greeted by the cloaked vestiges of Danzig's staging.

*Camp OZZY will be releasing a 30th anniversary remastered edition of "Blizzard of Ozz" and "Diary of a Madman." The two will release on May 31st in multiple editions, and will be available on CD or vinyl. A 30th anniversary limited edition box set will also be released, featuring a coffee-table book, double-sided wall poster, replica of Ozzy's gigantic gold cross, previously unreleased studio and live tracks, and the "Thirty Years After the Blizzard" DVD.

The show began with a hanging. The crowd cheered.

We’ll get back to that in a minute. Roughly an hour before the body was hung from the rafters and following a solid, capable performance by veterans Sevendust, Three Days Grace took to the stage. Capturing the attention of the largely teen crowd, the band rode through a complete set of their (remarkably similar) singles, the highlight being 2006’s “Pain.”

Back in November of 2009, I saw an up and coming band called Volbeat open for the legends known as Metallica. At the time, I confessed ignorance to the band; I knew their name, and I knew they were Danish, and that was about it.