heavy metal

1983 - The Year That Forged Metal - Final!

As is our custom, we close the annual Tribute Project with submissions and thoughts from around the metal sphere, as promised. A couple dozen people were nice enough to take time out of their lives and consider our question: "Out of all the artists who debuted or formed in 1983, which one has had the greatest impact on you personally or professionally?" the answers are varied, some heartfelt, some hilarious and many in between. Nonetheless, each one provides insight into the artist who gave it, and gives a glimpse into their dedication and fanhood. But enough.

1983 - The Year That Forged Metal - Part 3


M.DREW:
Speaking of Queensryche songs, if you ever really want to make a serious ‘Ryche fan angrier than all get out, tell him or her your favorite song of theirs is “Jet City Woman.” Watch the reaction. There might even be an eye twitch.

1983 - The Year That Forged Metal - Foreward by Paul Ablaze

Welcome to the annual Bloodygoodhorror.com Heavy Metal Tribute Project! This year, we have the honor of being ushered into our discussion by the esteemed vocalist from Montreal-based metal band Blackguard, Mr. Paul Ablaze:

Very seldom has a single year changed so much so profoundly in music. Trends and fads come and go in every era in one form or another, which makes the significance of what transpired in this specific time period all the more astonishing.

Album Review: Danko Jones – “Rock and Roll is Black and Blue”

Danko Jones, named after the band’s lead singer, has been around for over a decade, but despite their popularity in Europe as well as their native Canada, Danko Jones has failed to make much of a splash in the United States. With quality albums like 2003’s “We Sweat Blood” and 2010’s “Below The Belt” already behind them, it’s somewhat surprising they haven’t caught on in the same way similar bands like Buckcherry and Foo Fighters have, but Jones and his band continue to press onward.

Album Review: Omnium Gatherum - Beyond

Over the last few years, as the remaining remnants of melodic death metal withered on the vine, the genre as a whole began to suffer. It wasn't that the turn of the millennium strain of melodic death metal was a cultural touchstone that needed to be saved, but what replaced it didn't account for the very reason it ever existed. Melodic death metal was the bridge between those people who listen to music simply to be pounded by the loudest mash of noise possible, and those who can appreciate heavier sounds but still need to have a conventional song to wrap them in.

The Mothership Has Landed - An Interview With Kyle Juett

Coming straight from the musical heartland of Texas, Mothership stands poised to enter the fray as part of the new wave of blues-based, old-school heavy metal. A band born by the bonds of family and propelled by a pair of brothers, Mothership comes armed with riffs to spare and solos for everyone. Just before leaving for a tour with the mighty Gypsyhawk, Kyle Juett sat down with me to talk about his band, how they got here, where they want to go, and every stop in between.
M. DREW: Let’s start at the beginning because it’s an interesting story. You started a band with your brother and most notably, your dad. I don’t think that happens a lot, how did that come to be?

Album Review: Neaera - Ours Is The Storm

Death metal bands are at a disadvantage before I hear a single note of their music. Just by the nature of what they play, it's extremely difficult for any of them to stand out from the pack. Unlike every other genre, where voices and tones vary wildly, death metal is confined to a set of standards that make everyone sound more or less the same. While that's great for fans who are immersed in the music, and can pick out those small differences and magnify them, it leaves people like me weary from listening to album after album, band after band, that all blend together.

Always Building, Always Evolving, Always Working - A Conversation with Bjorn Strid of Soilwork

Swedish death metal was a wave. An irresistible force that consumed metal as we knew it, blazing a new trail that left ripples across the entire genre and touched every corner and splinter. In the vanguard of that cascade was Soilwork, a hungry band with an aggressive sound. As the years passed, the wave receded, but Soilwork remains, as strong as ever and on the cusp of the release of their double album "The Living Infinite." We talked with vocalist Bjorn "Speed" Strid on the eve of this release about the spirit of his band, the new album and the fortitude it takes to make a double record.
M. DREW: We’ll start at the top. You’ve just gone ahead and put together a double album. What made that the decision for this album cycle?

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