documentary

The trinity is complete. Now that Michael and Jason have been given another go in the remake realm, it's Freddy's turn and here to taunt and titillate is a teaser for a Nightmare on Elm Street documentary "Never Sleep Again: The Elm Street Legacy."

Daniel Farrands, director of the Friday the 13th documentary "His Name was Jason: 30 Years of Friday the 13th" returns to bring us "Never Sleep Again:The Elm Street Legacy" which promises to be a thorough look at Freddy's history.

Watch it here!

That's the trailer for "Wreckage of My Past," the forthcoming documentary about the life, times and experiences of Ozzy Osbourne. Looks interesting, though I can't help but feel from the way it's presented that it likely lionizes Ozzy quite a bit. It's being produced by Sharon and Jack Osbourne, so I suppose I should've expected as much. Even so, it might be a worthwhile viewing, as Ozzy has certainly lived an interesting life.

Do you like the film franchise "Psycho?" Do you like 90 minute documentaries with over 3 hours of bonus features? Are you looking for a snappy way to celebrate the movie's 50th anniversary?

Chances are, you haven't been struck by lighting. It's about the most random thing that could ever happen to a person, and tends to change that individual forever. In the upcoming film "Act of God," Sean Faughnan and Ezna Sands talk to lightning survivors in an attempt to wrap their minds around the violent phenomenon.

"Halloween... The Happy Haunting of America" is a documentary that originally came out in 1999, chronicling some of the best establishments in the world of haunted houses and attractions. The doc is hosted by prolific actor Dan Roebuck (check out his filmography), who is a huge horror fan and someone that we had the pleasure of meeting at the recent Horror Hound Weekend.

Through his extensive work from the late 60's to today, R. Crumb single-handedly defined the underground comic genre. Although Puritan parents of the era dealt out spankings for finding any comic stash, an unearthed copy of Zap Comix could mean a trip to boarding school, or perhaps even a mental institution. If you've ever truly wanted to try and get inside the head of the twisted man behind Fritz the Cat and Mr Natural, Terry Zwigoff's 1994 documentary "Crumb" is about as close as you can possibly get.

Don Dohler was just about the last guy on earth you would expect to have a cult following. He was a geeky, mild mannered, conservative man whose favorite film in life was "The West Side Story". He had played around for years with the idea of filmmaking, but beyond some short films shot on 8 millimeter, nothing had really come of it. That was until his 30th birthday. He started the day at his desk, doing the same mundane work he had done for years. He ended it with a shotgun to his head, and a new outlook on life.

I don't know why, but documentaries on the processes and machinations of making Z-grade horror are like crack to me. Whether it's something like "American Movie", "Horror Business", or the recent release "Blood, Boobs & Beast", I find myself absolutely fascinated with the kind of people who make this crap. I would never in a million years want to do what they do, or even watch their movies, and yet there is something so straightforward and genuine about these people you almost always end up falling in love with them by the time the movie's over.

For most of us, costumes are a once-a-year thing, if that. For the would-be protagonists of the Matthew Ogens' 2006 documentary "Confessions of a Superhero," costumes are not only a way of life, but sometimes their sole existence.

Sometime around 1977, I became aware of a late night phenomenon here in The San Francisco Bay Area. Through a series of overnights stays at the homes of friends with much more lenient parents than my own, I discovered a program called "Creature Features". Its host was a quiet, four-eyed, stogy-smoking oddball named Bob Wilkins.