british horror

Landing this week on US shores, Steven Sheil's "Mum & Dad", the latest dark horror film to come out of Europe. He sat down with us recently to talk about the film and its controversial subject matter, and here's what happened.

Orphaned twins Freida and Mariah, are en route to their uncle Gustav Weil’s (Peter Cushing!) homestead. What they don’t know of their uncle Gustav, is that he is the head of The Brotherhood, a group of vigilante witch burners scouring evil from the surrounding lands. Once they arrive they are subjected to Uncle Gustav’s tyrannical rule, leading to Freida’s late night scheming to rid herself of her oppressive Uncle. Sneaking out to visit Count Karnstein (Damien Thomas) we learn that one sister has an evil side, as the other remains pure.

Sometimes it feels like the days of discovering a new cult film are gone. With the internet and the DVD revolution a movie can go from obscurity to widespread discussion to fanboy backlash before it’s even had a proper release.

Just from some of the films I've seen lately, it seems that "hoodies", or groups of young adolescents from the suburbs, are a major problem in Britain. In many recent British films, such as “Hot Fuzz” and now “Eden Lake”, these adolescents are portrayed as a technologically savvy bunch with baggy clothing and thick slang-filled accents.

This may be a tad too low budget for my tastes, but I have to give it up for effective trailer editing when I see it. What we have here is the trailer for "Dead Wood", what appears to be a British horror film involving some campers in the woods, possible slashing, and I swear some Asian ghost stalking in there as well. Here's the synopsis:

Generally speaking, horror movies don't scare me anymore. Having watched a plethora of genre films during my 31 years on this crazy little planet, I've become somewhat desensitized to ghosts, jump scares, and gore, a fact which has caused me to question why, exactly, I spend so much of my free time consuming pictures that have absolutely no effect on me whatsoever. Locating a production that can get under my skin is an almost impossible task; were it not for films such as "Inside", "Frontier(s)", and "Eden Lake", my faith in the genre would be at an all time low.