Book Review

Breed Review

Take a quick glance at the cover and synopsis of “Breed,” by Chase Novak, and you’ll instantly think of Ira Levin’s “Rosemary’s Baby.” It’s an easy comparison, both are horror novels involving pregnancy and children. Dig a little deeper, and you’ll see other connections--both novels are set in upscale Manhattan and involve characters who are all elite and well-to-do. And just like Levin, Novak seems to use his novel to make statements about the wealthy just as much as scare the reader.

Book Review: How To Eat A Human Being by Dan Dillard

Dan Dillard's How To Eat a Human Being, is a collection of both poetry and short stories. Per usual with his writings, Dillard leads wild ride through the darker side of human nature and introduces seven unforgettable characters and their demons.

Book Review: The Gold Spot by JG Faherty

The pains of adolescence are well known by everyone. The struggle to find one’s self and be accepted by their peers is usually one of the most harrowing events in growing up. JG Faherty’s, The Cold Spot, illustrates the vulnerability of youth and the manipulation of death with unnerving detail and motivation.

Book Review: Delphine Dodd by S.P. Miskowski

Left on the roadside by their wayward and absconding mother, Delphine Dodd realizes this time is not like the others. She and her little sister, Olive, have been discarded on the side of the road like trash, only to find themselves floating aimlessly into the care of their unfamiliar grandmother. Set in the early settlement years before the First World War, S.P Miskowski weaves Delphine’s vivid recollections of her adolescence into a haunting dreamscape.

Book Review: Mourning Mansion by Billie Sue Mosiman

The 1980’s were a time of decadence and opportunity; two things with which Bill Turk is quite acquainted. On the lam from his ex-con past, he seizes a lucrative position within the oil industry and is determined to make as much money as possible. Driven by greed and desire, Turk embarks on constructing the largest mansion the Texan Mourning Bay has ever seen. Once completed, it is soon understood that the manor’s nickname, Mourning Mansion, doesn’t just come from the property on which it is located.

Book Review: Pig Man by Dan Dillard

Dan Dillard’s short story Pig Man is the prime example of that tin platitude, a little bit goes a long way. Clocking in at only eleven pages, Pig Man, successfully delivers the chilling creeps that loiter well past the fifteen or so minutes it takes to read it the story.

Book Review: The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood

Written in 1910 by Algernon Blackwood, The Wendigo popularizes an evil creature of legend from the Algonquian people of Native American Indians. The wendigo is a cannibalistic spirit that can either possess humans or is the creature in which humans can transform. Often described as extremely gaunt, skeletal gray in color and smelling of decaying flesh; the wendigo is associated with freezing winters, extreme famine but also gluttony.

Book Review: Mr. Hands by Gary A Braunbeck

**Important note: NO, this book has nothing to do with the infamous weirdo and horse video by the same name. Just in-case any of you get confused or decide to google "Mr. Hands." I'd definitely add "book" to those search terms - or don't, if you're into that kind of thing. **

Book Review: Kransen House by Sara Brooke

Ana and Ben Kransen are young newlywed parents trying to make ends meet in the early 1930's. Due to the stressful economic times, they decide moving from Ana's parents' conservative home in south Florida, to the more established family home of Ben's in northern Florida is the best idea. The Kransen family owns a business and Ben soon goes to work for his father to save money to finally begin a life with Ana and their baby, Angela, of their own.

Book Review: The Doll by JC Martin

Most little girls love dolls and will do anything to have the one they want. Joyce Parker’s daughter, Taylor, is no different. On a mother-daughter getaway to Mexico, the girls decide to visit an unusual tourist attraction: The Island of the Dolls. On the island, there are hundreds of dolls hanging from the trees and placed on altars in various stages of decomposition and disarray. Warned not to disturb anything on the island, Joyce is already unnerved enough by the atmosphere and carefully watches Taylor as she admires the eerily beautiful dolls; but close enough.

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