80's

Since we've recently taken on more reviewers here at Bloody Good Horror, it's given me a little bit of extra time each week that in the past was spent reviewing screeners. This has allowed me to do something that's been sorely needed in the last few years, ie dipping back into horrors of old and continuing to expand my horizons as a purveyor of the horror genre on the internet.

Anthony Perkins would’ve been 77 years old on April 4th, 2009. Sadly, Perkins was diagnosed with AIDS after a blood test in 1990 and eventually died from pneumonia in 1992. Perkins was a well established stage and television actor before he was tabbed by Hitchcock to play Norman Bates in “Psycho” in 1960. After “Psycho”, he would go on to enjoy a solid film career centered more on European productions than domestic work.

1982’s “Strange Behavior” is a strange little movie. It’s a mad scientist/revenge film, that was set in Middle America and shot in New Zealand. It features high level character actors but pairs them with kiwi first-timers that are incapable of anything approaching a yank accent. In places it is tonally similar to Gary Sherman’s “Dead and Buried” which was released the same year, but it wants to be more of an homage to 50’s era sci-fi/horror.

Latino review just posted this pretty intricate video review of the working script for Platinum Dunes "Nightmare on Elm St.". It's not exactly spoiler heavy, but it does outline the characters, Freddy's back story, and the main impetus of the plot. There was a revalation in the last 1:00 or so that I'm not totally jazzed about knowing early, so consider yourself warned.

The script sounds pretty interesting, except for all of the vomit inducing pop culture references they seem to have crammed in. Example, we first meet the main "teens" while they're playing Guitar Hero. Yikes.

We take a run at John Carpenter's "They Live", a fun, campy 80's horror flick with strong human and political themes.

Back in 1987, Michael A. Simpson directed both "Sleepaway Camp 2: Unhappy Campers" and "Sleepaway Camp 3: Teenage Wasteland", sequels to the underground cult original, "Sleepaway Camp". This interview was conducted circa 2003, soon after Robert Hiltzik's controversial "Return to Sleepaway Camp" had been announced. At the time, there were issues (and still may be) as to who owned the rights to make sequels, and how fans of Michael's entries to the series were treated by the team behind the original (and the STILL UNRELEASED "Return").