Everybody does it. Autumn hits, the leaves die off and turn pretty colors and little ghosts and goblins come knocking at your door to beg for sweet stuff. It's Halloween, that time of year that requires, dare I say demands, thrills and chills.

I have a theory that nostalgia is one of the most destructive and unproductive emotions people are capable of and can directly be blamed for many of the evils in this world, including 90% of VH1’s programming, the inexplicable popularity of any number of past-fetishizing politicians/pundits and Oliver Stone’s career. I’m far from innocent, myself - a disproportionate amount of the music on my ipod was recorded between 1992 and 1997 and I’ve spent plenty of beer-soaked nights trying to remember the lyrics to the theme song to “Mr. Belvedere” or who the fifth member of New Edition was.

Frank Henenlotter is a different breed of horror filmmaker. He definitely gyrates wildly to his own unique rhythm, instilling a sense of fun-loving absurdity into what would otherwise pass for watered-down psychodramas featuring a bevy of pathetic individuals not unlike myself. And while many proclaim "Brain Damage" to be the man's ultimate masterpiece, I'd have to say that "Frankenhooker" is truly my favorite Henenlotter film. Of course, that could very possible change at any given moment. In fact, I regret having written that. I wish I were kidding.

Quick question: Who wouldn't want to watch iconic actor/college professor/jazz musician Peter Weller valiantly battle a destructive, malicious New York City rat for nearly an hour-and-a-half? It's a tough temptation to resist, especially if you have an overwhelming hatred of prehensile-tailed vermin and a special place in your heart for "Robocop" and/or "Naked Lunch." Did I mention that the film in question is also the big screen debut of the undisputed queen of the erotic thriller, Shannon Tweed?

I'm not ashamed to admit that I'm just as excited about the 20th Anniversary Special Edition of Rick Sloane's entertainingly abysmal 1988 "Critters" wannabe "Hobgoblins" as I am the upcoming release of Fred Dekker's cult favorite "Night of the Creeps." Sad?

It ain't easy being a boy-toy. Just ask Jack Wade. With his acting career going nowhere he thought he'd hit the jackpot when he hooked up with and eventually married a rich Hollywood executive. Life was good for a while until Frankie, his wife, went under the knife for some liposuction and ended up in coma.

This is a bit of old news (in Internet time), but I thought it was well worth sharing for those of you that missed its first runaround. Fascinated by the pre-Mortal Kombat days of gaming, flickr user Steven Lefcort (tastypaints.com) materialized what he had always imagined when he was offing baddies in the innocent 8-bit days.

Welcome to my new project: 8-Bit Fatalities. The idea behind the project stems from growing up at an arcade, and my eventual love affair with Mortal Kombat.

The crew revisits "A Nightmare on Elm St.", before Platinum Dunes reinterprets the classic 80's film in next year's scheduled remake.

Since we've recently taken on more reviewers here at Bloody Good Horror, it's given me a little bit of extra time each week that in the past was spent reviewing screeners. This has allowed me to do something that's been sorely needed in the last few years, ie dipping back into horrors of old and continuing to expand my horizons as a purveyor of the horror genre on the internet.

Anthony Perkins would’ve been 77 years old on April 4th, 2009. Sadly, Perkins was diagnosed with AIDS after a blood test in 1990 and eventually died from pneumonia in 1992. Perkins was a well established stage and television actor before he was tabbed by Hitchcock to play Norman Bates in “Psycho” in 1960. After “Psycho”, he would go on to enjoy a solid film career centered more on European productions than domestic work.