M. Drew's blog

Album Review: Jane's Addiction - "The Great Escape Artist"

This is Jane’s Addiction. Or is it? Truly, it depends on what the name “Jane’s Addiction” means. If the name is synonymous with west-coast style funk influenced near-psychedelic alternative rock and roll, then “The Great Escape Artist” is not Jane’s Addiction. Contrarily, if the name “Jane’s Addiction” is less about the serialized sound of a band and more about a cadre of musicians constantly looking to experiment and broaden their aural horizons, then “The Great Escape Artist” is perfectly adept at carrying the umbrage of the title “Jane’s Addiction.”

Album Review: Charred Walls of the Damned - "Cold Winds on Timeless Days"

Ripper Owens, the mercenary singer for hire, gives the impression that he's a man trying to prove something. His tumultuous career began while filling in for Rob Halford's sabbatical in Judas Priest. He carried that into a spin with Iced Earth, and then was the singer for Yngwie Malmsteen (and is reported to be again.) An album with Beyond Fear and a solo project thrown on the pile for good measure, and Ripper has been around the block at least once.

Album Review: Rose Funeral - "Gates of Punishment"

More work to do. That's was my initial and lasting impression of Rose Funeral's "Gates of Punishment." The band prides themselves on their unique character of groove-based death metal, but that quality doesn't come through quite like the band would have you believe.

Album Review: Night in Gales - "Five Scars"

Night in Gales’ “Five Scars” touts itself as one of this year’s finest efforts in melodic death metal. That’s both true and not true.

Where “Five Scars” succeeds is in precision. Every note is timed perfectly, the measures attaching together like links of a long, unified chain. The drums of “This Neon Grave” alone should serve as testament to the band’s dedication to timed perfection.

Album Review: Glorior Belli - The Great Southern Darkness

To observe Glorior Belli's album "The Great Southern Darkness" objectively is to examine what seems like a collection of unaffiliated styles and locales. Bubbling up from the outskirts of Paris, the band carries a blend of extreme metal, black metal and late 90's-bred desert rock.

Album Review: Crowned By Fire - "Prone to Destroy"

Crowned By Fire's "Prone to Destroy" is an album that makes connections with all the touchstones of basic, straight up heavy metal. No flowery dalliances, no tangential expositions, no long, emotive complexities. Just guitar, bass, drums and vocals, all locked together with a growling attitude and a blues-backed sensibility.

Album Review: Warbringer - "Worlds Torn Asunder"

There’s a fair chance that much of this review will seem like a paraphrased version of our journey through Warbringer’s “Waking Into Nightmares” in 2009. That’s probably fairly accurate, but it stems from the fact that refreshingly little has changed about Warbringer.

Album Review: Anthrax - "Worship Music"

And here we are. After a twisting, turning, practically soap-opera-plot sojourn, Anthrax’s long awaited “Worship Music” is finally available to the masses in the form that the band intended. Or at least, intended for the third time. In any event, we’re pretty sure this is it for revisions to the wayward, prodigal album of thrash metal’s recent cycle.

Concert Review - Selfish Needy Creatures

To get to this show, I had to board a boat. Wait, a boat? Yes, a boat. Essentially, the show was a rock and roll river cruise, which is an astoundingly simple and yet profoundly novel concept. You got metal in my recreational boating! You got recreational boating in my metal! It continues to amaze me that this kind of synergy isn’t more realized by adventuresome promoters. Tell me you wouldn’t go to a metal show at a paintball park. In any event, it was like attending the “70,000 Tons of Metal” cruise, but much much colder and smaller. So, more like “7 Tons of Metal.”

Concert Review - Big 4 - Anthrax, Megadeth, Slayer, Metallica

How to describe a show that's thirty years in the making? An event so domineering it was called, without hyperbole, the largest metal show that the East Coast has ever seen. It was the culmination of a timely anniversary, fan support and the consistently discussed dream of all metal fans world wide. We asked and eventually, with some prodding, New York City's collective thrash prayer was answered.

So, the Big 4 and roughly fifty thousand of their closest friends came by all roads and paths to Yankee Stadium for an evening of heavy metal history and fury.

Around the Web

Syndicate content

What's New?

Wherein no one talks about people they banged in high school...

Podcast

In which we try to make sense of "Return to Nukem High: Volume 1"...

Podcast

Latest Reviews

Search

Around The Web